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Friends Don't Plagiarize Friends' Resumes

Article Title:  Friends Don't Plagiarize Friends' Resumes
Author Byline:  Liz Handlin
Author Website: http://ultimate-resumes.blogspot.com/2008/03/friends-dont-plagarize-friends-resumes.html

Earlier this week I received the following email from a client/friend of mine:

Hey Liz,

I hope you're doing well and business is still booming. I wanted to ask your opinion of something. After nine months, it has come to my attention that a former colleague/friend has plagiarized large sections of my resume (the one you helped me with). I offered it to her to use as a template when our employer was downsizing. We have been competing for the same contract jobs and she has recently undercut me for $10 less per hour on a 6-12 contract gig working with client of our former employer. The client assumed we had the same background and experience because we worked for the same employer and because she copied my resume. She's even posted part of it on LinkedIn along with other falsifications.

Any thoughts/ideas about what I can do?

Thanks,

Brad

My response was this:

Dear Brad,

I am so sorry to hear about this. If I could sue this woman for copyright infringement I would. This happened once before when another client did exactly what you did and shared his new resume that I wrote with a co-worker. The way I found out is that the co-worker/idiot who plagiarized his resume had the nerve to contact me to ask if there was "anything I could do to improve his resume" - I told him that he had already copied my work enough and that unless he wanted to pay me for the work he had copied that we had nothing to talk about.

In the future I recommend that you not show co-workers your resume because you really can't trust people not to screw you the way this woman has done. Plus, since you paid for the resume I would think you wouldn't want to give away the contents for free. I always get pissed when I find out that someone has plagiarized my resume work but I don't think there is much I can do about it short of copyrighting every resume I write and that probably wouldn't make my clients happy. This woman will get what's coming to her...what comes around usually goes around.

Regards,

Liz

The point of this post is: keep your resume to yourself unless you don't mind if ambitious co-workers copy your work or, possibly, take credit for your accomplishments. A huge part of the service I provide is helping my clients to target and articulate accomplishments. Do you want your co-worker to see the way you have described your success on a project and say, "Hey, I worked on that project too so I am going to put that great sentence on my resume."? What if, like my friend Brad, you wind up competing with this co-worker for the same job?

There are many ways to support friends and co-workers that don't involve giving away your resume so think defensively and don't share personal information that others could use to boost their careers at the expense of yours.

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.


Dear TypePad What Did I Do To Deserve This

UPDATED PART 2: My faith in TypePad and Six Apart has been restored including a nice email from CEO Chris Alden. I try not to blog angry but for better and worse my blog is the center of what I do whether I am blogging day to day or not. They did a good job helping me out and I appreciate what they do.

UPDATED: 24 hours and 53 minutes later my first inquiry from tech support. I wonder what I would be like if this blog was still down a day later and only just getting a response? Then again, you would not be reading this would you?

 

Let me start by saying I am a big fan of TypePad. I have a couple of other blogs using the platform. I know of at least eight other blogs that were started on TypePad because of my recommendation.

In almost three years I have had three very minor support issues, created by me, that were answered promptly and effectively the last well more than a year ago.

But yesterday TypePad was literally not there for me.

This blog went down around 10:15 am, “404 Not Found”, and I started wondering what did I do? After thinking what I had done in the last day, nothing, I decided I could not be the culprit.

I created an “Open Ticket” on TypePad support. While doing so I learned that of all the possible options one can say for why the ticket is created not one of them is, “my site is down.”

Really, how can that be? Even if it is rare I would think this deserves a category.

So I created the ticket and moved on. I called VISI as they have the mnheadhunter.com domain name. I am on hold for about 55 seconds listening to soothing Jazz music and a friendly guy answers. (I love their customer service) I explain the issue and he says, “Well let me try (I did not understand what he said but knew what he meant) and he says nope, not us. Your site is down.”

I had not thought about it until I hung up but I tried mn_headhunter.typepad.com and it too was “404 Not Found.”

I go to the registrar to make sure I had not made fatal mistake and lost the domain name. Nope, still had it and even if I had the mn_headhunter.typepad.com would still work if it was working.

All this time I am checking my “Open Ticket” status and see “Awaiting Staff Response."   

Around 5 pm last night I created a new ticket in another category to see if that would help. You guessed it, “Awaiting Staff Response.”

So I put to use my cyber sleuthing techniques to find someone at TypePad, yeah not so much so I shifted to Six Apart and then gave up trying to find the right person and sent an email to their CEO, Chris Alden, around 7:30 pm.

Surely sending an email to the CEO of the company is shooting much too high but when you are desperate for a human response you do what you have to do.

Went to sleep around 1:15 am with no status change.

I woke this morning around 7 am, checked my email, and my monitoring service sent me an email around 2 am Minneapolis time that the blog was up and running.

Surely this has to be a miracle of epic proportion because I further check my email and nothing from TypePad. I then check the “Open Ticket” and the status remains “Awaiting Staff Response.”

Rather than be one of those customers who rants without giving any suggestions let me give two:

  • Create an option for “My Site Is Down”
  • Let users rank their “Open Ticket” by importance

My guess is my “Open Ticket” is stuck behind user issues over the weekend and with no way of knowing the site was down stuck in line with users with less significant issues like I had the other three times.

I have to assume what happened to me is a fluke because in my sleuthing I did not find anyone else having had the same issue as me.

I guess I am that lucky. Great, now if it would work the same for me on the next lottery drawing...

This incident was not enough for me to look else where for a provider but as my new saying goes, “My blog goes down without reason once shame on you, if it goes down twice shame on me.”

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University Of Minnesota Looks At Student Facebook Profiles

I tried to reword the title of the post but my non-journalistic instincts did not come up with a better one.

The University of Minnesota as an entity is not looking at profiles but staff, faculty and the University of Minnesota Police Department are.

This should be common knowledge for anyone with a social networking profile but either the many local and national news stories are not getting through to users or the users do not care.

The Minnesota Daily has this article today, Who's looking at your Facebook?

There it is kids (and adults too), people are looking at your profiles. Get it now? Putting stupid stuff about yourself, family and friends in a public domain can and likely will come back to bite you in the ass.

Yes I said ass.

I am venting now but I long ago became tired of people saying it is not fair that their personal life is subject to scrutiny. Get over it. Better yet do something about it. Or event better yet stop putting it out there.

Do not post the stuff or at a minimum keep it private.

Universities and employers are not looking for the perfect choir boys and girls but they are looking for someone with some sense of dignity and character.

And maybe the University of Minnesota is looking at profiles of those applying like other universities and colleges are, College Admissions Officers Using Facebook, MySpace, and Other Social Networking Sites to Block Students:

"A recent study by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth found that 25 percent of college admissions offices admit to using search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and MSN to research potential students and that 20 percent look for the same information on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace."

For your education and your career stop posting your dirty laundry for everyone to see. I can imagine what kind of fun you had last Friday night but I do not need to see it and most importantly you do not want Friday night to impact getting into your college program or your next promotion at work.

Here ends what has to be my third or fourth rant on social network stupidity.


MN Headhunter Embraces Twitter

So I did it. I started using Twitter the past couple of days. I think the reason it appeals to me now a third time taking a look at it is that it allows me to get to know people better.

You can find me at MNHeadhunter.

I had this post a few months ago Twitdicted Or Are You A Twitter Virgin Like Me and I am waiting for Katie to call me out.

In the case of “old” friends, it will allow me to know what they have been up to without doing the email or the phone call and when we talk it will be a more forward conversation versus an update on what has been. For example I know from following Katie on Twitter she and her family were down in Texas with her extended family.

For “new” friends it will give me a chance to get to know them better.

Some funny things get shared like my realization this evening that while doing a complete, top to bottom condo cleaning I had MTV’s Making the Band 4 on. The good news is there is some talent there. Live music, not lip synchers. The bad news is I think I dropped 20 IQ points.

I also saw the issues many of my friends have had with their children, Easter Bunny, candy, and sugar overloads.

I am following a mix of friends, local and national recruiters, local business and tech folks, and Snoop Dogg. Yes, Snoop D. O. Double G.

Still getting used to keeping entries short as you can only have 140 characters per entry including spaces. That’s tough for a long winded guy like me.

Getting used to Tiny URL and also text message lingo. I am not much of a text message guy. I prefer people just call or send an email.

As usual, I am guessing this one of those things I will be late to adopt and then fully embrace.

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Some Things to Know Before Negotiating Salary with a New Employer

Article Title:  Some Things to Know Before Negotiating Salary with a New Employer
Author Byline:  Liz Handlin
Author Website: http://ultimate-resumes.blogspot.com/2008/02/some-things-to-know-before-negotiating.html

There are many schools of thought about salary negotiations and it appears that a great many of them involve game playing, duplicity, and tiptoeing around an actual number. I read a post by another blogger yesterday who gave what I thought was pretty bad advice about forcing the hiring manager or recruiter to give a range or a number before answering the question, “What salary are you looking for?”  Obviously everyone wants to get paid as much as they can but it doesn’t make sense (for most people) to refuse to answer this question with, at the very least, a salary range because if you do that you may just irritate the recruiter who asked the question. 

Why do recruiters ask for your salary?
Let’s face it most of us wouldn’t work for anyone else if we didn’t need the money.  So money is an important part of the employment relationship.   If your current salary is far below the salary range of the job that you are interviewing for, the hiring manager will want to understand why. Perhaps your current employer pays below market rate?  Or, it could mean that your skill set isn’t as developed as the job requires.  If you are selected for a job that pays significantly more than you are currently making an employer may make you a salary offer that falls near the bottom of the salary range.  The reason that some employers do this is so that they have more latitude to reward you for good performance with merit increases and promotions than if they had paid you at the top of the salary range.  If your current salary is higher than the range for the job you are interviewing for, you may not want to interview for a job that pays so much less.  On the other hand, maybe you are willing to take a pay cut to join a really elite team.  If that is the case this topic needs to be discussed in an interview. 

I have been involved in all sides of salary negotiations: as a headhunter, as an in-house recruiter, as a hiring manager, and in salary negotiations for myself.  While I don’t necessarily consider myself to be a great negotiator I do have a pretty good understanding of what is going on behind the scenes in salary negotiations and I hope to offer some suggestions for candidates.

Salary negotiation depends on several things:
Your level of experience and the level of the job you are interviewing for
-    the less experience you have and the less unique your skill set the less room you have to negotiate

With whom are you negotiating? (Hiring manager, HR representative, executive recruiter)
-    In most companies hiring managers make decisions about how to allocate their budgets.  Generally HR representatives are messengers who report your past salary, salary requirements etc to the hiring manager.  In some organizations the HR manager negotiates on behalf of the hiring manager.  Find out who makes the final decision about salary and perks and, if possible, deal directly with that person.

Type of company (small private company, company with VC money, large corporation, public sector)
-    Large companies may have more money but they usually have more policies, procedures, and bureaucracy.  In many large companies hiring mangers may not have a lot of latitude to offer larger salaries to new hires.  In small companies there may be more latitude but they may have fewer resources.  If you think your skill set is worthy of a large salary make a case for that during the hiring process. Make sure your resume sells your unique accomplishments and skills (back this information up with metrics when possible) and be sure to discuss those things when you interview.

Other perks that come with the job
-    Jobs that come with big benefits, big bonuses, perks (use of company plane), company cars, tuition reimbursement, sometimes have less flexible salaries because the employer realizes that the job is going to provide lots of other compensation.

Financial situation of the company you are interviewing with and industry trends
-    Profitable companies in growing industries are more likely to offer higher salaries so do your homework about the company and industry before trying to negotiate salary or benefits.

Salary Range
In most situations, a recruiter (in house or headhunter) will tell candidates the general salary range before they come in to interview.  In fact I haven’t heard of too many cases where a candidate doesn’t have some idea of what the company can offer.  It’s just a practical matter – if your salary or experience level is way off the mark it would be a waste of time all around for you to interview.

Salary vs. Total Compensation
When you are asked your salary you can discuss total compensation or actual salary.  I used to work for a company that would send us a report each year that explained our total compensation package.  That was the dollar value of our benefits, vacation, tuition reimbursement, bonus, and anything else we got from the company. Add up the total compensation you are getting from your current employer and you can use that number in salary discussions but be clear that you are discussing total compensation not salary numbers. If you want to fudge the total compensation number up a few thousand, you can do that without appearing to be a liar.  Total compensation isn’t always an exact number so that is a number that you could conceivably play with a little bit in order to appear to be making a higher salary.  But never ever lie about your salary because it is just so easy to find out what it is. 

Due Diligence
Before interviewing with a company find out everything you can about compensation practices, benefits, perks, and performance expectations so that you will know what to expect when you get a job offer.  Also, if you have this type of information you will be able to figure out what is and is not negotiable at the company.

Never Lie About Your Salary
All that an HR person has to do is call your current employer and ask them to confirm the salary number you gave them…if the number isn’t the same (your employer probably won’t tell them the exact number anyway – most just confirm information) then you look like a liar.  I have also known some companies that require potential hires to bring in the previous year’s W2 form and others that contract background checking services to check out potential hires. Again, if you lie about your salary you will probably forfeit the job.

Senior Executives/C-Level Executives
If you are a very senior level executive salary negotiations are much more flexible than if you are a junior player or even a mid-level manager.  Most companies have a lot of flexibility in terms of salaries, bonuses, option grants, and other perks for senior level execs simply because the expectations for their jobs are so high.  If you are a senior level executive you should probably contract an attorney and/or a retained search firm to negotiate your compensation package, contract, and severance agreement for you.  Tell your attorney what you want and let him/her negotiate with the attorney for your potential employer.  Top execs get incredible pay packages and perks and they seldom do the negotiating themselves.

Middle Managers
If you are applying to a large corporation as a middle manager the salary that they are planning to offer you is probably not terribly flexible.  You may be able to negotiate a signing bonus, or get the company to pay back any relocation or tuition assistance that you owe to your current employer.  You may be able to negotiate extra stock options or stock grants as well.  The key to getting those things is to convince the hiring manager that he/she can’t live without you.  Be likable and showcase your accomplishments in the interview. Don’t lie about or inflate your current salary.  When you are asked for your current salary or your salary expectations give a range and find out about benefits and other perks that will factor into your total compensation package.  Your new boss will probably want to pay you as much as he or she can but may be constrained by corporate policy or budget issues that you don’t know about. 

Sales Jobs
Great sales people can negotiate great compensation packages based on performance.  Sales are one area where companies are willing to pay big bucks for top performers because they directly contribute to the bottom line.  If you are a great sales person with an outstanding track record, bring some metrics with you to the negotiating table so the potential employer can see exactly what they are getting for their investment in you.

Entry Level or Junior Level Jobs or Non-Exempt Jobs
If you are entry level or a fairly junior player without specialized skills and experience you just don’t have a lot of room to negotiate.  You may be able to get a higher salary if, say, you have to commute further to the new job or you need to buy a car to drive to the new job.  If that is the case, mention it to the hiring manager and ask if they would consider additional compensation to cover your additional commute costs.  If that isn’t an option for them perhaps you can negotiate a flexible work situation that includes telecommuting for part of the week.  You may also be able to negotiate additional days off or tuition reimbursement.  Many companies have a dollar amount that they offer to junior employees – particularly those who join the company as a member of training program or a class (i.e.: first year Big 4 auditors or consultants) and that number tends to be pretty rigid.

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.

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Blake Hoffarber With Another Buzzer Beater And Likely Another ESPY Nomination

Blake Hoffarber has his own Wikipedia page, Blake Hoffarber, and will likely receive his second ESPY nomination in his young basketball career after Friday’s buzzer beater.

In January 2008 ESPN had this article on Blake, There's more to Minnesota's Blake Hoffarber than just trick shot and this quote,

"Every time I shoot it, I feel like I can make it," Hoffarber said, confidently but not arrogantly.

Foreshadowing perhaps?

To set the scene, Minnesota Golden Gophers are playing the Indiana Hoosiers in the 2008 Big Ten Tournament. Down by 1 to Indiana with 1.5 seconds left Tubby Smith calls a time out. The play was not designed to go to Hoffarber but sometimes things work out better than the plan. Let us not forget about Travis Busch who makes the long pass as the guy throwing it rarely gets any credit.

Here is some video of the video of the play itself (video may take a moment to play):

This second video is the four plus minute highlight of the game from the Big Ten Network (video may take a moment to play):

Then there is the play that won Hoffarber the 2005 “Top Play of the Year” ESPY as a high school Sophomore beating out the chip shot from Tiger Woods at The Masters.

Blake and his 2005 Hopkins High School team were down by 2 in the 1st OT of the championship game playing against Eastview High School when this happened at the buzzer (video may take a moment to play):

Hopkins and Hoffarber go on to win their state championship game in the 2nd overtime.

Blake Hoffarber was named 2007 Minnesota Mr. Basketball and I should also say that Travis Busch was 2005 Minnesota Mr. Basketball.


What is the difference between UML and RUP?

Article Title:  What is the difference between UML and RUP?
Author Byline:  Interview Questions
Author Website: http://www.boston-technical-recruiter.com

The unified modeling languege  is a standardized specification language for object modeling. UML is a general-purpose modeling language that includes a graphical notation used to create an abstract model of a system, referred to as a UML model. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Modeling_Language

What RUP is

The Rational Unified Process (RUP) is an iterative software development process framework created by the Rational Software Corporation, a division of IBM since 2003.

RUP is not a single concrete prescriptive process, but rather an adaptable process framework, intended to be tailored by the development organizations and software project teams that will select the elements of the process that are appropriate for their needs. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rational_Unified_Process

If your prospective BSA cannot explain to you the difference between these two core BSA concepts, reload your search.

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.

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Minnesota Recruiters Group FAQ’s

Over the past four weeks, the two preceding the Minnesota Recruiters (un)Conference | Winter 2008 and the two since, the number of Recruiters and HR professionals in this informal group has grown significantly.

Leading up to the event there were around 340 members and now 485+.

Most of the growth is due to our friends and colleagues who have attended the events telling their friends, co workers, and colleagues about them.

I started a Minnesota Recruiters LinkedIn Group which combined with the Minnesota Recruiters web site has created networking opportunities for the group. This has helped keep the momentum going while we are between events.

What is below is a FAQ to introduce new people to the group:

Minnesota Recruiters FAQ’s (March 2008)

Web site:
www.minnesotarecruiters.com

LinkedIn group (Minnesota Recruiter and HR professionals):
http://www.linkedin.com/e/gis/58696/58BAB676B50F

Newsletter:
1st and 3rd week of the month

Dues or fees?
This in an informal group so there are no dues and no fees for events. This is possible through sponsors who are committed to supporting the local Recruiter and HR community.

How many members and what is the make up of the group?
“Members” is a loose term. As of March 14, 2008 when combining those who have registered on the Minnesota Recruiters web site, joined the Minnesota Recruiters LinkedIn Group, attended an event, and/or asked to be added to the email list the number is 485+.

60% corporate
25% consulting/contracting firms
15% search firms/independent recruiters

How the group started:
The group started as an attempt to get the 11 local bloggers who write on career, HR, recruiter related topics together for lunch and through many conversations and some planning turned into an event at Best Buy corporate headquarters in July 2007 with 135 of our Recruiter and HR colleagues.

What is an (un)Conference, how often are they, how many attend, and why have them?
(un)Conferences are an informal get together of peers who listen to presenters and share their own experiences. We are very fortunate to have in our area national speakers and local experts on Recruiter and HR topics and they lead the conversations.

We will also be bringing in experts from around the country to present.

Topics are decided by those who are attending the events.

(un)Conferences are held quarterly (seasonally) and were held July 2007, November 2007, and February of 2008.

The main idea is less than 5% of the attendees have ever taken a trip to Orlando, Las Vegas, or where ever the big conferences are being held to spend 2-5 days and $3,000. In most cases there is not a budget or time to do so.

We are bringing that kind of information to these free events that take half a day.

The number of attendees has ranged from 125 to 135.

While doing these events and learning new recruiting techniques is an important part of what we are doing equally important is creating networking opportunities for everyone.

What topics have been presented?

July 2007:

  • Intergenerational Recruiting
  • MySpace, Facebook, and Other Social Network Sites: Best Practices for Recruiters
  • Blogging as a Recruiting and Employer Branding Tool
  • "Bringing Sexy Back" To Your Career Website

November 2007:

  • Talent Acquisition "How NOT to put a Square Peg in a Round Hole"
  • Top 10 SEO Tips For Company Job Boards
  • Web Recruiting: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

February 2008:

  • -A legal perspective on privacy issues in the work place, Googling candidates, use of blogs and social networking sites
  • Changing labor market, demographics, statistics from the State of Minnesota
  • The current state of the Twin Cities IT marketplace

When is the next event scheduled?
The Minnesota (un)Conference | Spring 2008 is set for May 16th, 8 am – Noon, Noon – 2 pm Lunch and Networking at Best Buy Corporate Headquarters. We will be using the Best Buy Theater, a change from the previous conference room seating, and able to increase seating to around 200 attendees.

The Minnesota (un)Conference | Summer 2008 is tentatively scheduled for July 18th with location TBD.

What is coming next for the group?
There have been many requests for a single topic session in a small group setting and for some sort of social activity, like a Happy Hour.

More will be announced on these ideas soon.

Group Sponsor and Co-Founder:

Volunteers and Co-Founders:

How do I join?
In order “join” the Minnesota Recruiters group, do any (or all) of the following: create a profile on the Minnesota Recruiters web site; join the Minnesota Recruiters LinkedIn Group; send an email with "Add me to your list" in the subject line to paul@mnheadhunter.com

To request more information or ask a question not covered above, please contact:

Paul DeBettignies
Minnesota Recruiters
Co-Founder and Coordinator
paul@mnheadhunter.com


MN Headhunter And Nerd Search Have Moved

Looks like I should have posted this, oh I don’t know, at the end of January I guess. Apparently I did not tell everyone and some friends have stopped by to see me while in the neighborhood.

I moved out of the UTEC space in Dinkytown. I now have a virtual office at Union Plaza in the Warehouse District in Downtown Minneapolis.

The new business address is:

Nerd Search
333 Washington Ave North
#300
Minneapolis, MN 55401

Virtual office should be read as virtually never there. My business this year is going to have me out of the office about 60% of the time so I decided for the first time in my 10+ year career I would go without space.

I was a little hesitant about this as I have never been a big fan of working from home. I never seemed to get as much done likely due to being easily distracted.

Over these past six weeks I have been pleasantly surprised that it has been OK. I have been as productive as I was in office space. I do find that I am working more so some balance will be needed but that could just be because there are quite a few things going on at the same time.

I have been making a point that on days when working from home that I “get out” for some reason. In the beginning there was a three day stretch where I did not leave or go outside. That could have been because it was darn cold at the time.

So far, so good.


Minnesota Recruiter Jobs

The following new Minnesota Recruiter Jobs have been added on the MN Headhunter Recruiting Gigs Page:

 

 

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